Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Topic Options
#101723 - 05/21/05 08:47 AM When a Killer Wants to Die
Bogey_Man Offline
CoS Member

Registered: 10/25/02
Posts: 1888
Loc: Lost.
(Note: Michael Ross was killed earlier this month, May 13th 2005. Lethal Injection)

When a Killer Wants to Die
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/02/02/60II/main671202.shtml

(CBS) Convicted rapist and serial killer Michael Ross is sitting on Connecticut's death row.

If Ross had his way, he would have died Wednesday morning, making him the first person to be executed in Connecticut in 45 years. But with only 36 hours to spare, a judge stayed the execution.

On 60 Minutes Wednesday, in an incredible death row interview, Ross pleads to be executed, and explains his decision to die, after more than 20 years behind bars. Correspondent Charlie Rose reports.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"I'll be truthful. I don't want to grow old in prison. This is not a life to live. You know? This isn't a great life," says Ross. "I mean, the day they put me back there and kill me, that's not gonna be a real sad day for me. I’m gonna be leaving this. I’ve done 20 years of penance here, so it’s not gonna be a sad day. But that’s not why I’m doing this."

Ross claims that his decision to seek his execution is to spare the families of his victims more pain: "There's some of those family members who just want this over, you know?"

Ross began killing in 1981, when he was an undergraduate student at Cornell University. By the time he was arrested three years later, eight young women were dead. The murders were brutal.

"I know why I'm here. Every day, I wake up and I know why I'm here," says Ross. "There's no denying what I did was horrible," he says. "None whatsoever."

The judge ordered a mental competency exam, which was conducted by a court-appointed psychiatrist on videotape, because Ross wants to do something unusual. He wants to waive appeals that would prolong his life indefinitely.

"I know a lot of people don't understand. And a lot of people disagree," says Ross. "But I just believe it's the right thing to do."

His attorney, T.R. Paulding, found himself in the unusual position of facilitating his client’s death. "It's not something I ever envisioned doing," says Paulding. "And I've said to my wife, 'If I do a good job, Michael Ross dies.'"

And that's just fine for some outspoken members of the victims' families.

"If he wishes to die, let him die. Because that's my wish," says Edwin Shelley, whose 14-year-old daughter Leslie was kidnapped and killed, along with her friend, April Brunais, on Easter Sunday in 1984, in Griswold, Conn.

Two months later, Ross raped and killed Wendy Baribeault, 17, and he was arrested shortly after. He ultimately confessed to eight murders.

Once in prison, Ross was diagnosed with mental illnesses – including “sexual sadism,” a disorder characterized by sexual arousal from the "suffering of the victim." It can include "torture," "rape," "strangulation" and "killing."

"He basically can't control these urges that he has. He has described them as type of monsters or demons in his head that were constantly urging him to do these things," says Paulding.

Paulding took the case, even though he personally opposes the death penalty. "I felt that he had made a logical, rational decision," says Paulding. "He needed a voice in our court system. And so, therefore, I decided to -- attempt to help him through this process."

"He said the only reason he’s doing this is he believes that as a defendant – that the lawyer’s job is to represent the defendant’s wishes," says Ross.

But is that the role of a defense attorney? To just simply do what the client wants?

"That's an interesting thing, when you put defense in front of the word 'attorney.' I think I'm an attorney before I'm a defense attorney," says Paulding. "Because obviously, as a criminal defense lawyer, your usual role is either to have your client found not guilty or to arrive at the best result you can arrive at. But I think your duty, your basic duty as an attorney, is to represent your client."

"I find it hard to believe that an attorney advocating for his client’s death is necessarily in the client’s best interest," says Gerard Smyth, the chief public defender for the State of Connecticut. His office represented Ross until last year, when he fired them because they refused to go along with his decision to die.

Despite this, they continue to work to stop his execution.

"Nothing that we're doing in any way is intended to diminish or minimize what he did or what the victims have suffered," says Smyth. "But we have a legal responsibility as a public defender agency for the State of Connecticut to attempt to bring to the court's attention all of the facts that exist, with regard to his mental competency."

Smyth is critical of this exam and the conclusions of the court-appointed psychiatrist who found Ross competent. The doctor wrote that Ross "has a clear and comprehensive understanding of his legal position," and is "fully aware" that his decisions "will lead to his execution."

The report confirmed Ross' mental illnesses and noted medication he takes for depression and anxiety.

"In my view, this medication is keeping me competent," says Ross. "If I wasn’t taking anti-depressants, I would be clinically depressed probably, and that would be an issue of competency."

Ross is also treated with DepotLupron, which reduces his testosterone levels and diminishes his perverse, violent sexual urges.

But Smyth says there has been no real analysis of the effects of Ross' medication on his decision to waive his appeals: "We believe that without drugs, he would be in no position to do this. In fact, in the competency hearings, he testified and told the court that without the drugs, he didn't think he could follow this through."

Paulding, however, says: "A person can suffer from one or more mental illnesses, and that can have no affect on his ability to remain competent."

While he talked mostly about his mental state in the videotape, Ross also spoke a lot about his upcoming execution.

"I have always had nightmares of the execution night," he says. "The fact that there will be a whole mess of people out there cheering my death is not something I particularly relish."

"Michael, in this videotape, looks really intelligent. Rational, has made a decision," says Rose. "Does that videotape, to you, lie?"

"No, I think the videotape doesn't tell the whole story. It doesn't tell some of the things that our own attorneys have observed," says Smyth. "Some of the internal struggles that he's going through."

Like what? "Over this decision," says Smyth. "Whether to go through with it or not."

In recent weeks, Smyth's office filed several unsuccessful motions up to the Connecticut Supreme Court, arguing that Ross was incompetent, and that they should represent him.

"Michael Ross is volunteering and wants to be found competent," says Smyth. "His attorney wants him to be found competent. The state wants him to be found competent. And to no one's surprise, the court found him competent."

"In other words, then, because you weren't there, no one stepped forward to say he's not competent," says Rose.

"That's correct," says Smyth.

Ross was scheduled to die Wednesday morning. But just 36 hours before his execution, the public defenders earned a stay of execution in federal court. On Tuesday, that stay was upheld.

"We asked for 30 days – that would be the ideal situation," says Smyth. "We're pleased to have the opportunity to proceed further."

Ross will have another competency hearing, but Paulding says it's all a diversion. "I think anyone that has been with Michael Ross for as long as they have, they absolutely know that he's competent," says Paulding. "There's no question."

So why is Ross doing this? "I think he's doing it because of his mental condition," says Smyth. "I think he's depressed and he's suicidal. I think he wants the state to assist him in committing suicide."

In fact, Ross has attempted suicide three times while in prison, most recently in 2003.

But in the videotape taken last month, Ross said that his decision now is not about state-assisted suicide.

"They say, for example, this is nothing less than state-assisted suicide. Mr. Ross wishes the state to execute him, to extinguish a life that he no longer wishes to live," says Ross. "I mean, that really makes me angry when I read stuff like that. It really makes me angry because they know that's not the issue, you know? That's not it. That's not what's going on here."

Ross says it's about the victims' families, and read a newspaper quote from one father: "You can live with it. Adjust to it. But when it's brought back up, it's agony. And you can keep that and quote that and put that in your damn report. Because I think that's frigging important. Sorry."

But public defenders say Ross' primary concern is not for the families. They point to a 1998 letter in which Ross wrote that he had been interested in "state-assisted suicide," that he wanted to "end my own pain," and that sparing the families more anguish was "icing on the cake."

"These are musings of Michael Ross. And the public needs to know that Mr. Ross has written numerous things," says Paulding. "And like anybody else who arrives at a complex and a difficult decision like this, he has gone through a thought process of questioning. Is my decision right? What is it based on? Am I really doing any good by making this decision?"

Paulding says he believes that Ross' decision is based on the victims' families: "There's no doubt in my mind that that is his primary motivation."

"We believe that the execution itself will not bring people the relief that they anticipate," says Smyth, who is personally opposed to the death penalty.

"You know what people say. 'This is all about public opposition to the death penalty. You do not want to see somebody executed in Connecticut after 45 years of no executions in New England,'" says Rose.

"I know people say that. And in fact, that's true," says Smyth. "But that is not the basis upon which we have instituted these efforts to save Michael Ross from the execution."

"What I'm hoping is that Jan. 26, I will be executed," says Ross.

But despite his hopes, the efforts of Connecticut's public defenders have temporarily derailed his decision to die.

"I just don't understand why the public defenders can't understand that," says Ross. "I mean, it's so simple. And it's my damned decision."


© MMV, CBS Worldwide Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Top
#101724 - 05/21/05 08:48 AM Re: When a Killer Wants to Die [Re: Bogey_Man]
Bogey_Man Offline
CoS Member

Registered: 10/25/02
Posts: 1888
Loc: Lost.
From CNN. Post-execution

http://www.cnn.com/2005/LAW/05/13/ross.execution/

SOMERS, Connecticut (CNN) -- In New England's first execution in 45 years, the state of Connecticut put serial killer Michael Ross to death early Friday.

The 45-year-old Ross was executed for the killings of four eastern Connecticut women in the 1980s.

Ross had rejected all efforts to halt his execution, saying he wanted to die. But his father and court-appointed attorneys tried to stop the state from proceeding, claiming Ross was not competent to drop his appeals.

Christine Whidden, the warden for the Carl Robinson Correctional Institution, said Ross was put to death by lethal injection and pronounced dead at 2:25 a.m. ET at nearby Osborn Correctional Institution in Somers.

Media witnesses said Ross made no final statement, never opened his eyes and moved very little ahead of the chemicals being administered. As the drugs flowed into his veins, they said, Ross became completely still.

"Michael Ross did not have any final words," said Shelly Sindland, a reporter for WTIC in Hartford who witnessed the execution. "When asked if he wanted any final words, he said, 'No, thank you.' He did gasp for air, shuddered, and after that there was no movement whatsoever."

The execution was the first in New England since 1960, when Connecticut inmate Joseph Taborsky died in the state's electric chair. Four of the other five states in the region -- Maine, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Vermont -- have no death penalty, while New Hampshire's last execution was in 1939.

Ross admitted killing eight women -- six in Connecticut and two in New York -- as part of a crime spree in at least five states.

He was sentenced to death for killing Robin Stavinsky, April Brunais, Wendy Baribeault and Leslie Shelley in eastern Connecticut in the 1980s.

Stavinsky's sister, Debbie Dupris, said the execution did not give her the closure she was expecting to feel, but it did serve a purpose.

"Finally justice has been served," Dupris said, "and I know that our sister, Robin Dawn Stavinsky, is looking down upon us at this moment, and I know that she will rest easier knowing that the person who ended her life no longer has the privilege of having his own."

All of Ross' victims were 14 to 25 years old when he strangled them to death. He admitting raping all but one of them.

Dzong Tu, a Vietnam-born graduate student in economics at Cornell University in New York, is believed to have been Ross' first murder victim. Her death followed a string of rapes on campus in the spring of 1981. Ross also was a student at the university.

"We will always miss my sister," said Lan Tu, Dzong's brother, "and I feel that this was only (a) small measure of justice for the pain that Michael Ross caused our family and the loss, but it is an ending."

Edwin Shelley, whose daughter Leslie Shelley was killed by Ross along with her best friend in 1984, said the convicted killer got what he deserved.

"We have waited 21 years for justice, and I would like to thank the jury in Bridgeport, the jury in New London, and finally the state of Connecticut for finally giving us the justice that our children are due."

Preceding the execution, a string of last-minute appeals failed.

The U.S. Supreme Court late Thursday denied a pair of appeals by family members to postpone the execution.

Earlier in the day, the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals also turned down the family's effort to delay the execution, rejecting a motion filed by Ross' sister, Donna Dunham.

Ahead of the scheduled execution, about 400 people carrying anti-death penalty signs quietly marched toward the prison where Ross was to executed.

T.R. Paulding, Ross' private attorney, said Ross repeatedly invoked his right to die and asked that his wishes be respected. If a full round of appeals were allowed, it most likely would prevent his client's execution, he had said.

Ross' relatives argued he was suffering from "death row syndrome," in which a person's mental state is degraded by being on death row for a long period -- causing a person to think it would be better to die.

Top
#101725 - 05/21/05 09:31 AM Re: When a Killer Wants to Die [Re: Bogey_Man]
IronCrafter Offline


Registered: 04/10/05
Posts: 733
Loc: A Harsh Reality ,Wa USA
He chose a clean death over a living death,living with what he had done. And probably a much easier one than he really deserved.

This system mystifies me-why do we have to keep filing appeal after appeal..When there is NO doubt of what these sorts of people have done? This man was deranged and dangerous by his own admission,death WAS the only cure for what ailed him.

But 20 freaking YEARS this man was housed and paid legal expenses for? Those resources could have been put to MUCH better uses!

This country is seriously screwed up,and our politics are ridiculously polarized. NEITHER side works EFECTIVELY. There IS a third side,and that is what simply will WORK in a practical and just manner.

Why do these sheep have such a hard time seeing that?
_________________________
"Life is an objective-achieve it." "Be who you are and say what you feel,because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind." Dr Suess My home page featuring my work can be found here. HS! Crafter

Top
#101726 - 05/22/05 12:40 AM Re: When a Killer Wants to Die [Re: Bogey_Man]
Enchantress Offline

CoS Member

Registered: 02/11/05
Posts: 2167
Loc: Canada
From reading this, it's my conclusion that this killer wanted a State-assisted suicide.
I believe that this would have been too good for him!
What justice would be served by that?

I read a book awhile back called "A Clockwork Orange" by Anthony Burgess.
In this novel, the main character commits acts of "criminal sexual sadism" just like this one in real life.
As a punishment, and to keep him from further offending, he was sentenced to prison for a time, then was given a form of treatment, where if he even thought of committing a crime - he would feel anything from nausea to intense pain, depending upon the criminal intent that was present.

I realize that it's just a novel, but these things could possibly be explored - rather than giving the criminal what he wants: a State-assisted suicide.

_________________________
We are everywhere. Are you one of Us?
"The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing." - Walt Disney
Undercroft Profile: Enchantress
Undercroft Sign Up

Top
#101727 - 05/22/05 12:44 AM Re: When a Killer Wants to Die [Re: Enchantress]
TrojZyr Offline
CoS Witch

Registered: 07/25/01
Posts: 12990
Loc: The Solid State
Ah, but remember, the protagonist also loses the ability to enjoy classical music, which to me is just tragic.

Perhaps I am an odd person, but while I will fantasize about bodily harm and emotional terrorism of all kinds when it comes to miscreants, psychological programming heads down a dangerous hallway for me.
_________________________
"Gentlemen, the verdict is guilty, on all ten counts of first-degree stupidity. The penalty phase will now begin."--Divine, "Pink Flamingos."

"The strong rule the weak, and the cunning rule over all." HS!

Top
#101728 - 05/22/05 12:59 AM Re: When a Killer Wants to Die [Re: Enchantress]
mattevans Offline


Registered: 01/14/04
Posts: 147
Loc: Japan
Once innocent people are dead it is impossible to achieve real justice. The best we can hope for is to prevent the culprit from committing these crimes again. Personally I think that this is best achieved by an execution. Whether the criminal wants to die or not is largely irrelevant.

Top
#101729 - 05/22/05 03:11 AM Re: When a Killer Wants to Die [Re: Bogey_Man]
Mallamun Offline


Registered: 03/02/04
Posts: 12
I agree somewhat with Matt Evans on this. Bloody hell what the criminal is thinking, wants, or what he deserves. The crime is done, and revenge rooted in the emotional issue of "what he deserves" is useless. The primary objective past his crimes is to prevent those crimes from ever being a threat to society again. Personally, I think of self-confessed murderers like him to be loose baggage. Within the legal system, he should be treated as a weight, not a person. Since it actually costs LESS to keep a person alive in prison than it does to execute them (an execution by injection, for some stupendously ridiculous reason, is written to cost close to three million, depending on the state), I think he should have just been kept alive in prison, unless by some means it became more cost-effective to execute him. Personally, I think those are both shitty options, and I detest the American justice system, because I believe that wrong-doers should still be made beneficial for society (and by that I mean beyond stamping lisence plates). But what will you. Quite honestly, my main concern when reading that article wasn't the killer himself. It was the lawyers and other legal people involved!

A) Against the better wishes of the defendant, the families, and common sense, tax money was wasted to postpone his death because that is "due procedure".

B) Once in prison, Ross was diagnosed with mental illnesses – including “sexual sadism,” a disorder characterized by sexual arousal from the "suffering of the victim." It can include "torture," "rape," "strangulation" and "killing."

"He basically can't control these urges that he has. He has described them as type of monsters or demons in his head that were constantly urging him to do these things," says Paulding.


Is our society really so deep in the dark ages that our understanding of these aspects of the human nature is THIS dim?

C) "In my view, this medication is keeping me competent," says Ross. "If I wasn’t taking anti-depressants, I would be clinically depressed probably, and that would be an issue of competency."

Ross is also treated with DepotLupron, which reduces his testosterone levels and diminishes his perverse, violent sexual urges.


I could start a whole new topic on the sheer frustration of the medication issue. The fact that they're even wasting money to medicate a CRIMINAL IN JAIL for his BRAIN is mind-numbing in itself!
_________________________
~Meddle naught in the affairs of Dragons, for thou art crunchy, and taste good with ketchup.

Top
#101730 - 05/22/05 04:26 AM Re: When a Killer Wants to Die [Re: Mallamun]
bianca Offline


Registered: 10/09/04
Posts: 142
Loc: Right where I should be.
Quote:

I believe that wrong-doers should still be made beneficial for society (and by that I mean beyond stamping lisence plates).





I agree. Two options come immediately to mind: 1.target practice 2. Quality control in a wood chipper factory.
These people are given better deaths than those allowed to people dying of cancers,MS,etc, and certainly better than those of their victims. ONE appeal per customer, at maximum,should be allowed. Failing that, an immediate bullet to the back of the head would solve the problem.
_________________________
"....a powerful sorceress must be cautious about aligning herself with, and transferring power to, unworthy men."

Top
#101731 - 05/22/05 04:30 AM Re: When a Killer Wants to Die [Re: TrojZyr]
MagisterParadise Offline

CoS Magister

Registered: 07/03/01
Posts: 3262
Loc: Burlington, VT
Quote:

Ah, but remember, the protagonist also loses the ability to enjoy classical music, which to me is just tragic.




But, for a criminal well beyond the consideration of sympathy? Please. To deprive him of musical enjoyment, for what this character in the movie did, is too kind. #655321 should have been dealt a far more severe punishment. The primary lesson that "A Clockwork Orange" imparts is the danger of lenience in the judicial system at its extreme. Musical deprivation would be the nicest of sentences, in my opinion.

He should have been lucky to not receive the Roman punishment, the very culture he orgasmically ponders in the film... that of him being handed over to the families who were victims of his crimes, for them to do what they wished with him (and I mean that beyond the paltry equivalent in the movie... no Beethoven... please! Spare me that insult to true Justice). I'm certain that, in Roman regard, his lack of exposure to "Ludwig Van" would have been the last thing on his mind.

Somehow, the words, "hung, drawn, and quartered" come to mind. Viddy THAT!

To your credit, I know that, through a number of years of exposure to your posts, you are, in no way, advocating violation of the law, or any number of illogical actions stemming from emulation of this film. Mostly, I'm merely pointing out some facets of the picture that other visitors from which might not reach intelligent conclusion. We don't just write to each other -- one on one -- on this board, after all.
_________________________
Ever Forward!
Magister Matt G. Paradise - Church of Satan

****** READ DIABOLOGUE OFTEN ******

Purging Talon | On Facebook | On SatanNet
Bearing The Devil's Mark @ Amazon | The Book of Satanic Quotations @ Amazon | Terror Transmission

--------------------
"The world isn't black and white. It's grayscale" - Steve Wozniak

Top
#101732 - 05/22/05 09:41 AM Re: When a Killer Wants to Die [Re: Bogey_Man]
Svengali Offline
CoS Magister

Registered: 03/06/03
Posts: 12460
Loc: Florida, U.S.A.
This is like a rerun of Gary Gilmore. How soon they forget.

When “red handed” guilt is established (DNA and other forensic methods are making this more of a lock-sure reality) they should be summarily executed outside the public courthouse.

They deserve a swift death, for the sake of expediency – removal of their threat and closure for the survivors of the victims.

Let them die.

Those who argue the high cost of the death penalty need to acknowledge the money is mostly devoured by lawyers feeding off the appeals process.

A .45 cal. bullet only costs a few cents.

Then again, think of the advances in medical research that could be the result of no-holds-barred experimenting on human subjects.
_________________________
Live and Let Die.
"If I have to choose between defending the wolf or the dog, I choose the wolf, especially when he is bleeding." -- Jaques Verges
"I may have my faults, but being wrong ain't one of them." -- Jimmy Hoffa
"As for wars, well, there's only been 268 years out of the last 3421 in which there were no wars. So war, too, is in the normal course of events." -- Will Durant.
"Satanism is the worship of life, not a hypocritical, whitewashed vision of life, but life as it really is." -- Anton Szandor LaVey
“A membership ticket in this party does not confer genius on the holder.” -- Benito Mussolini
MY BOOK: ESSAYS IN SATANISM | MY BLOG: COSMODROMIUM | Deep Satanism Blog

Top
#101733 - 05/22/05 09:57 AM Re: When a Killer Wants to Die [Re: Svengali]
IronCrafter Offline


Registered: 04/10/05
Posts: 733
Loc: A Harsh Reality ,Wa USA
I think I have to agree Svengali.

When a killer is proven to be so, beyond all doubt, let us have closure on the idea of *it* retaining any human rights-and let it default to the status of meat.

And either make the best use of it,or dispose of it promptly. I can't think of a better deterrent for a person considering commiting crimes, than to be lost to that level of objectification.
_________________________
"Life is an objective-achieve it." "Be who you are and say what you feel,because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind." Dr Suess My home page featuring my work can be found here. HS! Crafter

Top
#101734 - 05/22/05 10:10 AM Re: When a Killer Wants to Die [Re: IronCrafter]
Tiberia Offline

CoS Witch

Registered: 04/19/05
Posts: 894
Loc: Los Angeles, CA
I'm partial to how Stephen King puts it.

If a killer is caught and there is absolutely no room for doubt of their guilt, he/she should be charged, tried, and executed within three days time.

Keeping them alive is nothing more than a waste of money and resources.

HS!

Top
#101735 - 05/22/05 10:25 AM Re: When a Killer Wants to Die [Re: Tiberia]
IronCrafter Offline


Registered: 04/10/05
Posts: 733
Loc: A Harsh Reality ,Wa USA
Correct.

And death should be by a single bullet administered to the spinal cord at the base of the skull-death is instantaneous.

Any expense over the 35 cents needed for a 45 calliber slug , and clean up costs after, is ridiculous.
_________________________
"Life is an objective-achieve it." "Be who you are and say what you feel,because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind." Dr Suess My home page featuring my work can be found here. HS! Crafter

Top
#101736 - 05/22/05 10:37 AM Re: When a Killer Wants to Die [Re: Svengali]
Rev_Malebranche Offline
CoS Reverend

Registered: 06/03/02
Posts: 4136
Loc: Oregon
I absolutely agree.

The appeals process is necessary because guilt is not always cut-and-dry. I really don't personally have a lot of faith in juries of "peers," the ability of the legislature to craft laws that make sense, or the ability of judges to remain impartial. The idea of encouraging the state to execute people makes me wary only because the state screws so many other things up. It's like handing a gun to a 10 year old and hoping they don't do anything stupid.

But in the case of murder, when people are caught in flagrante delicto or when guilt is openly admitted (not coerced), appeals are pointless and wasteful. It's disgusting that we pay for this dead man walking beaurocracy, not to mention the criminal's living expenses.

Top
#101737 - 05/22/05 10:50 AM Re: When a Killer Wants to Die [Re: Bogey_Man]
Rev_Malebranche Offline
CoS Reverend

Registered: 06/03/02
Posts: 4136
Loc: Oregon
Quote:


Ross' relatives argued he was suffering from "death row syndrome," in which a person's mental state is degraded by being on death row for a long period -- causing a person to think it would be better to die.




What passes for the 'science' of modern psychology is really amazing, sometimes.

That's not a syndrome. It's a sensible evaluation of the situation, based on experience and available facts. Unless you're some latter day Marquis de Sade, writing crazy books in your little cell, death does seem like an option worth considering--over life imprisonment.

The idea that the state actually prevents inmates from killing themselves is absurd. I propose a suicide play room!. A distraught inmate can fill out a little form and be led to a room where they can privately choose any number of ways of doing themselves in, for 24 hours. A special lethal injection chair, a gas chamber, a simple noose apparatus, a knife (on a chain, so no guards could be harmed) and a warm bath, maybe even a drug overdose, etc. There could even be a call button, where they could ask for assistance! There could be a sign on the wall, a giant "thumbs up" illustration with a caption that reads, "DO THE RIGHT THING!"

Top
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >


Forum Stats
12198 Members
73 Forums
43974 Topics
406012 Posts

Max Online: 197 @ 10/04/11 06:49 AM
Advertisements