Page 8 of 10 < 1 2 ... 6 7 8 9 10 >
Topic Options
#346287 - 08/15/08 09:16 AM Re: Another Lengthy Introduction [Re: Seth Lucius]
Danielle Alicia
Unregistered


Thank you Seth, and may you have a long life of fruitful activities as well!

Now, I am going to segue onto something else. This is a bit more about me for those who have an interest...(I have received several private messages asking many of the same questions so I thought I'd detail some of the answers here in this introductory thread for everyone to view).

I spend the majority of my time indulged in writing as a career. It is what I have been doing since the age of 12. I am a method writer, so whatever I am writing about I will completely submerge myself into. If the previous sentence went straight by you with no real recognition of what was just said then you will never understand me even in the most basic sense.

My primary motivation for this career is that I have the deepest love of literature; I love the way novels can strongly trigger our imaginations to create personal interpretations of images and scenes. To me, the reader is generally in more control of their experience while reading a novel--than say, the viewer of a movie or TV program--and for that, I find books to be such noble works. (That doesn’t mean I dislike movies; on the contrary, I adore them). A well-written novel easily allows the reader to use his or her imagination to a very full expression; in effect, I, the Creator of my work, then extend the hand of sub-creation to the reader, instead of trying to do all the work for them. I am the idea and the seed, but the reader is the grower, the cultivator, the caretaker.

On the weekends I dabble in music (guitar, harp, violin, piano), and have long, empathic talks with close, personal friends about our recent experiences and fulfillments in life. Sometimes we take in a symphony, opera or ballet mid-week just to inspire further creative insights. Other times I may spend hours cooking with the absolute finest, natural ingredients (I am friends with many of the local farmers here), to create food with multiple, specific notes--as in perfumery--and have intimate dinner parties where my friends, love interests, family and I will feast and relish each and every delectable, tasty morsel.

I also occasionally date, but it is getting rarer and rarer for me, because I am highly selective about potential mating partners. I prefer those men whom I deem to be my muses; they must bring to me creative motivation or I tire of them quickly. This type of inspiration can have a variety of catalysts, so I am always on the lookout for that man who is inexplicably drawn to me--and I to him. One of my requirements is that they live nearby me, though, as I am not into computer dating, cyber-sex (I'll take the real thing, please) or long-distance relationships unless a person regularly makes a commitment to actually see me. I have 3 homes, so the general places I date are New York (Long Island), France, and Utah. I travel to a particular home whenever the artistic mood suits me.

I am polyamorous and haven’t yet been into monogamy because it’s always been created—in my life-- from others through a place of insecurity or fear. Monogamy is fine for me as long as it happens with the intention of creating deeper levels of loving closeness through the exploration of even more rich time together; too often, however, I have seen that monogamy happens out of the belief that a person fears they will lose their mate to another if they become sexual with someone else. I do not have this fear, as I have never personally lost love, I feel I only gain new ones. If a mate of mine were to decide to spend more time with another, well, I want them to be happy because I love them. So, why would I be upset? To me, it's silly. I don't put people into cages (unless they like it and ask for that sort of thing), and I will never allow anyone to put me into one either.

I have had polyamorous relationships for years and have kept a primary partner who lives with me; I have found that by being in a loving place in our minds with many only serves to benefit everyone involved with us. We have never had a problem with jealousy or possessiveness; we believe these are just disguises of love and not love in its purest sense.

I never own a person; all I own are the experiences we shared. The above are simply my views, and my views only.

To all who have written me here in this thread and in private, thank you for showing interest and for helping an honest smile cross my lips.

Top
#346293 - 08/15/08 09:39 AM Re: Another Lengthy Introduction [Re: ]
Templar LXVI Offline


Registered: 08/08/08
Posts: 13
Loc: Australia
Originally Posted By: JustAnotherBeast
Greetings and Salutations;
...I am quite confident that you will enjoy your stay in the only place on the World Wide Web were the company actually have minds to speak with.


I do not wish to incite argument to taint this warm thread but my question goes to you; Do you truly believe this to be the 'only' place on the world wide web where there are intelligent people? How many intellectuals are there not on this board who have just been reduced due to their absense?

This is not an attack, merely a question for I too do not have this answer. Do you?

LXVI


Edited by Templar LXVI (08/15/08 09:41 AM)
_________________________
"Let us have a dagger between our teeth, a bomb in our hands, and an infinite scorn in our hearts!" - Benito Mussolini

Top
#346294 - 08/15/08 09:39 AM Re: Another Lengthy Introduction [Re: ]
7Phase1 Offline

CoS Member

Registered: 04/17/05
Posts: 89
Loc: Tallahassee, FL
Raises a glass! Isn't it nice when life is good?

To your success!

HS
_________________________
"The God I believe in isn't short of cash mister!" - Bono

Top
#346303 - 08/15/08 10:03 AM Re: Another Lengthy Introduction [Re: 7Phase1]
Danielle Alicia
Unregistered


Originally Posted By: 7Phase1
Raises a glass! Isn't it nice when life is good?

To your success!

HS


Indeed it is. A life fully lived is my goal. smile

Top
#346309 - 08/15/08 10:39 AM Re: Another Lengthy Introduction [Re: ]
Fnord Offline


Registered: 06/19/08
Posts: 211
Loc: Texas
Hello and welcome!

Forgive my tardiness in responding to your thread, I've been vacationing on the sunny and somewhat dirty gulf coastal beaches of Texas (all part of the charm). I've enjoyed reading your thoughts and views on various subjects herein and do share your affinity for topic immersion. As such, I hope to engage you on a topic or two when lightning strikes and the rod stands ready. Until then, welcome, based upon what I've read I think you'll find herein a room full of familiars!

Top
#346325 - 08/15/08 11:31 AM Re: Another Lengthy Introduction [Re: ]
7Phase1 Offline

CoS Member

Registered: 04/17/05
Posts: 89
Loc: Tallahassee, FL
As a method writer, I am curious if you find it hard to "detach?" Or do you purposely stay attached until your work is done? I know there are many different styles using method. I have even known a few that go as far as creating a scene and actually roleplaying to spark transistions. Your thoughts?
_________________________
"The God I believe in isn't short of cash mister!" - Bono

Top
#346328 - 08/15/08 11:58 AM Re: Another Lengthy Introduction [Re: Fnord]
Danielle Alicia
Unregistered


Originally Posted By: skullfarmer
Hello and welcome!

Forgive my tardiness in responding to your thread, I've been vacationing on the sunny and somewhat dirty gulf coastal beaches of Texas (all part of the charm). I've enjoyed reading your thoughts and views on various subjects herein and do share your affinity for topic immersion. As such, I hope to engage you on a topic or two when lightning strikes and the rod stands ready. Until then, welcome, based upon what I've read I think you'll find herein a room full of familiars!


I see nothing to forgive...you are living your idea of happiness and that is what life is all about! It is a pleasure to finally meet you though, and yes, we can talk about topic immersion and other subjects anytime you desire. Thank you for taking the time to read my introduction. smile

Top
#346331 - 08/15/08 12:15 PM Re: Another Lengthy Introduction [Re: 7Phase1]
Danielle Alicia
Unregistered


Originally Posted By: 7Phase1
As a method writer, I am curious if you find it hard to "detach?" Or do you purposely stay attached until your work is done? I know there are many different styles using method. I have even known a few that go as far as creating a scene and actually roleplaying to spark transistions. Your thoughts?


Well, that is an interesting question you asked! I personally do not find it hard to detach, when I want to. I also only write about subjects which are a deeply felt part of the authentic me, so even in the broad area of fiction, I never would role-play something that wasn't authentic. So, what this means is that I already embody the subjects I will proceed to write about, but as I write about them I learn more (through research) and I immerse myself fully into just that area of life to experience the characters and scenes more fully. I do create the scenes in my own life, yes, but they are always organic to the real me.

For instance, in a certain erotically-charged novel I wrote (won't give out the details), I lived the entire time in France and lived out every scene in the book, including the heartbreak, drama, and ultimate betrayal. Although I purposefully set out to create the drama and love interests, it was authentic--every bit of it--right down to the genuine feelings. Now, I didn't create the scenes solely for the reason of only writing my novel. I created them to live a full life while knowing all along they would also produce the autobiographical work. The fictionalized parts came in later as I adapted certain times, conditions, dialogues and characters to better meet a more dramatic, entertaining criterion.

In my latest work, which is a trilogy that is in the apocalyptical genre, there are many aspects of the work I am living out right now. I am exploring mythologies, how they are created (I am a fan of Joseph Campbell), and working to initiate my own mythology through the work. I better not say much more than that! smile

Thank you for the question!

Top
#346335 - 08/15/08 12:54 PM Re: Another Lengthy Introduction [Re: 7Phase1]
Muse Offline

CoS Member

Registered: 01/19/08
Posts: 586
Loc: In Your Dreams
Originally Posted By: 7Phase1
As a method writer, I am curious if you find it hard to "detach?" Or do you purposely stay attached until your work is done? I know there are many different styles using method. I have even known a few that go as far as creating a scene and actually roleplaying to spark transistions.



Well hmmmmm, I've used method acting for several of the roles that I've played and I never really thought of the concept of method writing, although we are both story tellers attempting to bring an audience into our world. Very interesting. I've learned something new today. smile

HS!
_________________________
http://www.myspace.com/twilighttales
Hear Adult Fairy Tales, Short Stories, Poetry, and more! coopdevil
Twilight Tales with Muse only on Radio Free Satan!!
(Currently on hiatus while I attend to grad school, but I have every intention of bringing the show back when the time is right!)


The holy trinity: Me, Myself, and I.

"Does anyone ever realize life while they are living it? Every, every minute?"
- Emily, Our Town, by Thornton Wilder


"Life's like a ballgame. You gotta take a swing at whatever comes along before you wake up and find it's the ninth inning." ~Vera (Ann Savage) in Detour





Top
#346348 - 08/15/08 02:22 PM Re: Another Lengthy Introduction [Re: Muse]
Danielle Alicia
Unregistered


Thank you for your thoughts! What happens with me is that I become the reality concealed deep within the character's mask I wear.

“The killer awoke before dawn, he put his boots on, (then) he took a face from the ancient gallery,” (Morrison, 1967). This quote from Jim represents one of two faces of Dionysius, the god of carnivals and masquerades (Dawkins, 1906). It is the tragic face, the opposite of the comic face, which are both often represented side by side in theatres. They are, in fact, as many artists come to experience them, one and the same face. This is seen in ourselves, our human condition. We have elements of tragedy, of the killer, the dramatically hateful side of pain and death. Yet, we also experience the wonderful travel, joy and laughter, the fun times and euphoric sex. This isn’t something just limited to human beings; it seems to be in every single element of existence. Our universe may be seen by some as a scary, dark place that someday will burn up or implode on itself. And yet, it is this same place that provides the flowers for the honeybee, the sun for crops, and nourishes life into existence. It is the tragic and comic face all wrapped up in one, and we, as products of it, are simply passengers in its grip of time. “Beneath the conformist there lies the Satyr,” (Nietzsche, Kaufmann, 1873).

So, as a method writer I become the character I am writing about, replete with all their personal history; all their experiences become mine, every facet of their lives is understandable and attainable to me as their symbiotic creator. At some point, the character and I cease to be separate and we become one, striving forward for the same understanding, creating our future together. I feel all their emotions, because in some way, they really are simply me. They couldn’t have come into existence without first existing in some way inside of me first. Yet, while we are one, we are also separate, all at the same time.

It is the way of all things, in my very humble opinion; it is the very essence of the universe itself. One, but separate, no true division, yet lines all the same. I see life as maybe more a continuum than a division. Of course, even the air we breathe can be philosophized away into subjective realities, so everyone will have their own viewpoints. Conflicting ideas do not necessarily mean they are even truly at odds with each other. They may have much in common, even if it's just their dissimilarities!

Anyways, I become very emotionally involved with a character’s struggles and other experiences. For instance, when writing about one such person lost in the woods I couldn’t leave the story unfulfilled to eat dinner, because they, and I, were too scared. After the situation in the story was resolved, I then sat down to a nice meal. If they couldn’t eat, neither could I!

I strongly use the method of prewriting, and much of it is done in my head before it ever reaches the outline phase. I can see the book I will create, the characters, the full outline of the tale in my mind, and actually see the words come alive to spell out the picture. This may sound strange to you, but I think in words, not images. When I think of a tree, I think of the words to describe it. Think of it this way: see the tree in your mind and now imagine its shape is made up solely of words that tell you what it is, how and what it's experienced. If you do that, you will begin to understand how I see everything in my world around me. It’s all words to me, everywhere I look.

I have done free-writing in the past, when I am searching for a new, viable method of approaching a subject that has already been done to death. It helps to have a thesaurus handy, so when I am caught using the same old tired words, I can add a beautiful garget to a sentence whilst simultaneously expanding my vocabulary in the process.

I ask a lot of questions from others before writing a novel. There are always key areas that I find I am a bit murky on, or need further philosophical guidance in. When writing about a small plane crash once I had to know what the inside of the cockpit area looked like, among many other details. I talked to several pilots to get a feel for flying and crashing, gauges, training, and wind anomalies. I have gone all over the world to do my research, and that is one of most enjoyable aspects of my job, because I become so enthralled when learning something new. I have a keen love of deconstructing what is taught in history books into something new and fresh. I also find that studying about actual places and peoples helps me understand them better, and in turn, my empathizing with a character helps bring him or her alive to the reader.

I suppose, if I had to choose which step in my writing process was easiest, I would have to say the actual writing is easiest, as the words just flow and glide like having burdens of honesty neatly rope-tied. Outlining in my head is fun too because I love imagining the world I am about to play Goddess in. I get really lost during those times!

The most difficult aspect of my work would be sitting down to write when I am ill! I came down with a bad cold a few months ago and felt like death warmed over. However, I always find that when I do break through laziness with self-discipline, I always feel better about myself afterwards. I simply view writing through illness as just another skill that I am always refining in the writing process.

In conclusion, my methods vary, yet they are all about feeling in union with my art; in this way, I return to zero. Let me explain: I feel I began with zero at birth, entered into the void with understanding, returned to zero with experience, and then, in symbiosis with my art I gave up the idea of zero altogether. This is the only way I know, despite a large vocabulary, how to express what it is like to live as a method writer. Literature isn’t meant to be just read, it is meant to be experienced, to be lived, to be killed, all in the spaces of the mind.

Top
#346502 - 08/16/08 08:54 AM Re: Another Lengthy Introduction [Re: ]
ParaBellum Offline


Registered: 12/01/06
Posts: 87
Loc: Plausibly deniable
Awww, I'm late to the party. frown

Hail and Welcome, Danielle. Yours was without a doubt one of the best intros I've read and twelve pages later you still don't disappoint. It seems you'll be a true asset to this site! smile

HS

Top
#346508 - 08/16/08 09:24 AM Re: Another Lengthy Introduction [Re: ParaBellum]
Danielle Alicia
Unregistered


Thank you ParaBellum! It is a pleasure to make your online acquaintance! Have a wonderful, fulfilling day! smile
Hail!

Top
#346513 - 08/16/08 09:42 AM Re: Another Lengthy Introduction [Re: ]
barrytheblade Offline
Banned Douche

Registered: 07/12/08
Posts: 48
Loc: WA
Hello, Danielle. It seems I'm a bit late for this train, but I usually don't read introductions; not that I'm a snob, but many usually are the same. I was raised such-and-such and found this book and it opened my eyes... I think most of us have pretty much the same story.

However, I noticed that this one was getting a lot of play so I read it and noticed that you were raised as a Witness. I, too, had the doubtful privilege of coming up in that organization. As you've probably guessed, it didn't end well.

I'm glad to see you here and I wish the best for you with your books. When you get them published, I'm sure you'll let us know. Couldn't hurt the bottom line if a good number on here checked them out, hmm?

Top
#346521 - 08/16/08 09:54 AM Re: Another Lengthy Introduction [Re: barrytheblade]
Danielle Alicia
Unregistered


I appreciate your welcome, and it is always nice to meet another Witness who woke up!

Top
#346780 - 08/17/08 03:00 PM Re: Another Lengthy Introduction [Re: ]
Danielle Alicia
Unregistered


Barrytheblade, I am curious as to your story on how you managed to break free from the brainwashing effects of the JW religion, and at what age you did so? Would you mind sharing the information with me? I think it is always amazing when I hear of someone else's experiences in this regard.

Top
Page 8 of 10 < 1 2 ... 6 7 8 9 10 >


Forum Stats
12088 Members
73 Forums
43862 Topics
405449 Posts

Max Online: 197 @ 10/04/11 06:49 AM
Advertisements